9 ways to quit smoking you probably haven’t tried

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One way to help improve your cashflow and live a longer, healthier life is to kick smoking as a habit. Here are some tips that might help you quit for good

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Despite the energy prices set to fall this year, many people are still engulfed by the cost-of-living crisis.

At the time of writing inflation stands at 4%, 3% higher than March 2020, pushing people's expendable cash to the limits.

The average price for a 20 pack of king size cigarettes in January 2024 was £15.26 in the UK – up £2.42 from the previous year and £4.60 five years ago in 2019, making smoking a particularly expensive habit to keep up.

Smoking is therefore likely one financial outgoing you could do without; and (bonus) quitting also improves your health.

Desire to stop smoking is currently high among British smokers. In 2022, the Opinion & Lifestyle Survey, developed by the Office for National Statistics (OPN), found that 45% of British smokers wanted to kick the habit.

Just 16% said they do not want to quit.

Smoking rates is also decreasing across the country. Around 6.4 million people over the age of 18 admitted they were a regular smoker.

This is the lowest proportion of current smokers since records began in 2011. However, the rate of British adults using an e-cigarette daily or occasionally is steadily on the rise.


Read more on why vaping is not ‘risk free’ by heading to the Vitality Magazine : Why vaping is not really risk-free | Magazine | Vitality

Taking control of your health

The health implications of smoking are well documented. If you’re a smoker, you are at higher risk of cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung disease, diabetes and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Time, however, is something else you can enjoy back when you quit smoking. Studies suggest one cigarette shortens a smoker's lifespan by 11 minutes.

Meanwhile, life expectancy among smokers is a staggering 10 years shorter than that of non-smokers, says the NHS

Quitting smoking before the age of 40 can also reduce the risk of dying from smoking-related diseases by around 90%, according to the National Cancer Institute.

9 ways to a smoke-free life

Once you’ve made the decision that you want to live a smoke-free life, picking a quit date is the best way to start. Add it to your calendar and prepare yourself.

When the hesitations inevitably kick in, remember that you are gaining from quitting smoking not losing out.

Reframing in your mind that you are ‘quitting’ smoking, rather than ‘giving up’, makes it feel less challenging and that you are not losing out on a part of your life.

Once you made up your mind, follow these recommendations from the NHS to get your quitting journey on the road and, more importantly, make sure you stick to it.

Sticking to stopping smoking

  • List your reasons to quit
  • Tell people you are quitting
  • If you have tried to quit before, remember what worked
  • Use stop smoking aids, such as Allen Carr’s stop smoking programme or nicotine replacement therapy (NRT)
  • Have a plan if you are tempted to smoke
  • List your smoking triggers and how to avoid them
  • Keep cravings at bay by keeping busy
  • Exercise away the urge
  • Join an online support group 

Find out more about you can start your quit smoking journey with Vitality.

As a Vitality member, you could save up to £349 on the Allen Carr Stop Smoking Programme.

Available with health insurance and life insurance plans. Log into Member Zone or find out how to become a Vitality member via vitality.co.uk for the details.

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